The Old Archbishops’ Palace Part Three: Roman Narbonne Again

…continued from Part Two

Despite the fact that the museum had some wonderful Roman artefacts, the lower galleries which exhibited them were extremely drab and grotty.  However, that’s all going to change since they are going over to their new home, the NarboVia Museum, in 2020.  So, there’s no need for a commentary…  by the time you get to see these objects, they will doubtless be beautifully displayed.

How it was… The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Juvenile torso, end of the 2nd century, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Memorial of the shipowner Tiberius Junius Eudoxus, 2nd century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Fragment showing the end of a ship, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Amphorae depicted on the funerary relief of a wine merchant, Roman era, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Lower part of a funerary relief, Roman era, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Roman anchor, found in 1990 in the Port-la-Nautique, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Epitaph of a vase seller, Philomusus, beginning of 1st century, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France.

Funerary relief of a baker, Marcus Careius Asisa, 1st century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France. “Marcus Careius Asisa, freedman of Marcus, baker, made this while he was alive for himself and for Careia Nigella, and for Careia Tertia, daughter of Marcus, who died at the age of six. With my daughter I repose here, me, her mother, struck by lamentable destiny, which on the same day, brutally, put us into the grave.”

Detail showing the grinding of flour from the funerary relief of a baker, Marcus Careius Asisa, 1st century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Cover of a funerary urn, Roman era, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Fragment of a funerary relief with a dog, “Cytheris L…”, 1st century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Urn burial, 1st century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Burial of an infant, 1st century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Detail of the top of the funerary monument of Quintus Julius Earinus, end of 1st century, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Funerary monument in the form of an altar, Roman era, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Cylindrical cippus, Roman era, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Funerary monument with the bust of a woman above a niche for libations, “Advena mother of…”, Roman era, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Fragment of a funerary monument, “…L Sergius the Gaul have made…”, second half of the 2nd century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Fragment of a funerary monument with a woman, end of 1st century, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Funerary monument of a woman, with traces of paint, Roman era, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Fragment of a funerary relief showing an apple seller, 2nd century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France. “Apples, ladies, my good ladies.”

Ossuary, 2nd century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Lintel for the door of the Church of the Rustic Bishopric, 5th century, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Bacchus mosaic, Roman era, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Detail showing an animal being carried to sacrifice, 3rd/4th century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Early Christian sarcophagus depicting Jesus and the apostles, 3rd/4th century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Sarcophagus from the school of Arles, 4th century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France. Depicted are (from the left) Jesus curing the blind, St Peter, Jesus and St Paul.

Detail of Jesus from the Sarcophagus from the school of Arles, 4th century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Detail of Jesus curing the blind from the Sarcophagus from the school of Arles, 4th century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Sarcophagus of the Arles School, 5th century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France. Left: Moses and his shoe, the multiplication of the loaves, the healing of the blind, an orant, the miracle of the paralytic, Daniel and the lions, resurrection of the son of Naim.

The cover of the sarcophagus of the Arles School, 5th century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

Detail of the cover of the sarcophagus of the Arles School, with a female orant surrounded by men, 5th century AD, The Old Archbishops’ Palace, Narbonne, France

So In Summary

Since the museum is currently being entirely redone and the Roman artefacts are winging their way over to their new home of NarboVia, there’s not much point saying much about the whole thing.  The objects on show are great, and hopefully in 2020 they will be housed in such a way that they will be really shown off to their best advantage.

 

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