Call in the Cavalry!: Stockholm’s Army Museum on a Dark Winter’s Night

Swedish Army Museum, Armémuseum, Stockholm, Sweden

I know some people don’t like army museums – either because they can be seen as being staid and dull, or because of the ethical implications of ‘celebrating’ the savagery of war. Perhaps because both my grandfathers were in the army, I find them quite fascinating.  And this one was particularly good.

The Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  Yes, that's a tank at the front.

The Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  Yes, that’s a tank at the front.

The museum is open for a late night on Tuesdays, and when we visited on a very dark December night, it felt like we basically had the place to ourselves.  This made for a rather unique experience, because, as some of the images will show, there were some highly vivid wax models, and some eerie displays.

The Army Museum has quite a heritage.  It originally opened in 1879, located on a site that was the main artillery depot, and its purpose was to collect equipment from armies around the world.  The current building is from the 18th century, a design by Carl Johan Cronstedt and Colonel Carl Ehrensvärd – a very elegant and vast structure which looks imposing on a dark, snowy night.  Originally known as the Artillery Museum, in the 1930s it was rebranded with the name Army Museum, and it was refurbished and reopened in 1943.  It was refurbished again, and reopened in 2002.  It still feels very fresh, which is unusual for 21st century renovation projects.

Because the history of the army is closely associated with the complexities of politics in war, I’m just going to give a basic overview of the highlights of the museum for me – which were mainly the amazing uniforms and evocative displays.  Actually, that was really the main point of the museum too – there were weapons on show, but not a tiresome amount.  And what they had was really interesting.

The way you’re greeted is pretty chilling.  At this point you know that the museum isn’t going to dodge the brutality of war.

Brutal and eerie room to greet you as you start the exhibition space, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Brutal and eerie room to greet you as you start the exhibition space, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Juxtaposition of nasty apes against a Brueghel painting of war, with a touch of 2001: ASpace Odyssey, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Juxtaposition of nasty apes against a Brueghel painting of war, with a touch of 2001: A Space Odyssey, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Some 16th century soldiers being creepy, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Some 16th century soldiers being creepy, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Life for a family in a military camp, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Life for a family in a military camp, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Some well curated displays, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Some well curated displays, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

The banner of the Polish 1st Company Banner, yellow silk, painted motif, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It was taken as a trophy during the Polish wars of Charles X Gustav in 1655-1660. The sheaf symbolises the Polish king, John II Casimir Vasa. On one side it says "Caelitus erigor" (from heaven am I raised), the other says "Pro rege et patria" (For King and country."

The banner of the Polish 1st Company Banner, yellow silk, painted motif, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It was taken as a trophy during the Polish wars of Charles X Gustav in 1655-1660. The sheaf symbolises the Polish king, John II Casimir Vasa. On one side it says “Caelitus erigor” (from heaven am I raised), the other says “Pro rege et patria” (For King and country.”

Infantry flag, c 1600-1650, silk, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It is one of the oldest surviving Swedish banners.

Infantry flag, c 1600-1650, silk, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It is one of the oldest surviving Swedish banners.

Model of a battle formation, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Model of a battle formation, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Shot Furnace, late 18th century, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It was used for heating cannonballs, which were then fired to set fire to ships or wooden structures.

Shot Furnace, late 18th century, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It was used for heating cannonballs, which were then fired to set fire to ships or wooden structures.

24-Pound Case Shot, late 18th century, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It was loaded with one-pound shots and scrap metal and was used for close-range shots, at sea and on land.

24-Pound Case Shot, late 18th century, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It was loaded with one-pound shots and scrap metal and was used for close-range shots, at sea and on land.

20-Pound Spike Bomb, late 16th cent, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  This truly terrifying bomb was loaded with gunpowder, drenched in pitch and sewn into a piece of sailcloth. When it exploded, the chunks of burning pitch would stick to thatched roofs and wooden structures.

20-Pound Spike Bomb, late 16th cent, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  This truly terrifying bomb was loaded with gunpowder, drenched in pitch and sewn into a piece of sailcloth. When it exploded, the chunks of burning pitch would stick to thatched roofs and wooden structures.

A man smoking a pipe and looking like a more dynamic Jeremy Bentham, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

A man smoking a pipe and looking like a more dynamic Jeremy Bentham, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Model of the Finspång Cannon Foundry, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  The model shows the process of manufacturing cannon barrels.  In 1618, the Dutchman Willem de Besche received permission from Gustav II Adolf (he of the Vasa) to run a foundry in Finspång in Östergötland.  His countryman, entrepreneur Louis De Geer, provided part of the funding. The existing works were repaired and expanded. A new blast furnace was built, made of stone with twin stacks - the first of its kind in the country.

Model of the Finspång Cannon Foundry, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  The model shows the process of manufacturing cannon barrels.  In 1618, the Dutchman Willem de Besche received permission from Gustav II Adolf (he of the Vasa) to run a foundry in Finspång in Östergötland.  His countryman, entrepreneur Louis De Geer, provided part of the funding. The existing works were repaired and expanded. A new blast furnace was built, made of stone with twin stacks – the first of its kind in the country.

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Model of the Finspång Cannon Foundry, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Two of four military coats, probably 1680s, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. These coats are more or less internationally unique representatives of military fashion toward the end of the 17th century. Their history is unclear, but it is thought that they were brought from France to Sweden in the 1670s by Nils Bielke, to act as models for the domestic manufacture of uniforms. The coats differ somewhat in their details, but are all cut in the French 'justaucorps' style.

Two of four military coats, probably 1680s, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. These coats are more or less internationally unique representatives of military fashion toward the end of the 17th century. Their history is unclear, but it is thought that they were brought from France to Sweden in the 1670s by Nils Bielke, to act as models for the domestic manufacture of uniforms. The coats differ somewhat in their details, but are all cut in the French ‘justaucorps’ style.

Buff coat, 1680s, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  During the 17th century, cavalrymen were often given elk skin buff coats, sometimes a centimetre thick. The buff coat could protect its wearer from cuts and stab wounds. However, it was also very absorbent and became heavy when wet.  This contributed to its becoming less common in the 18th century.

Buff coat, 1680s, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  During the 17th century, cavalrymen were often given elk skin buff coats, sometimes a centimetre thick. The buff coat could protect its wearer from cuts and stab wounds. However, it was also very absorbent and became heavy when wet.  This contributed to its becoming less common in the 18th century.

Coat Model 1687, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. In 1687, Charles XI decreed that all the regiments of the army should wear blue coats, moving away from the tradition of different regiments wearing different colours.

Coat Model 1687, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. In 1687, Charles XI decreed that all the regiments of the army should wear blue coats, moving away from the tradition of different regiments wearing different colours.

A scene in a church with soldiers, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

A scene in a church with soldiers, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

The wax and the weapons, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

The wax and the weapons, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Cloak, 1680s, broadcloth lined with baize, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  The lining and the ribbon on the collar were originally red.

Cloak, 1680s, broadcloth lined with baize, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  The lining and the ribbon on the collar were originally red.

Banner Model 1686, for the Östergötland Infantry Regiment, silk, original red, with the province coat of arms of Östergötland, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  On the battlefield, the four company banners were carried in the middle of the troop formation and served as a point of orientation.

Banner Model 1686, for the Östergötland Infantry Regiment, silk, original red, with the province coat of arms of Östergötland, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  On the battlefield, the four company banners were carried in the middle of the troop formation and served as a point of orientation.

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In the middle of a cavalry charge, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Grenade Satchels, early 18th century, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  The grenadiers kept four hand grenades in the satchels.  The strap was fitted with a small tin tube, where a slow burning match was kept.

Grenade Satchels, early 18th century, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  The grenadiers kept four hand grenades in the satchels.  The strap was fitted with a small tin tube, where a slow burning match was kept.

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A soldier getting ready to shoot, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

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The dead in the snow, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

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Levy Banner made for the Daretorp parish in Västergötland, 1710, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  Troops remaining at home were levied to defend the home districts in case of enemy attack.

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Sealed pattern for a cavalry boot, approved by the King, 1690s, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

The museum is rightly proud of the many beautiful banners it has in the collection.  These were collected from routed enemies, but some are also Swedish.  Unfortunately, the information on each was only available on a computer-thing, which wasn’t responding when we were there, so I don’t know anything about them.  So here are some pretty pictures to show what they had…

A banner with the Virgin and Child, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

A banner with the Virgin and Child, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

A banner with gold embroidery on damask, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

A banner with gold embroidery on damask, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

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Banner with a naval battle scene, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

A range of amazing banners used by Swedish and other armies, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

A range of amazing banners used by Swedish and other armies, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Shirt Model 1757, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  There's a label on the shoulder which shows it's been approved by the Swedish Council of War.

Shirt Model 1757, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  There’s a label on the shoulder which shows it’s been approved by the Swedish Council of War.

Uniform Model 1756, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. In this year, the government had the bright idea of having all infantry, no matter what regiment, wear similar uniforms.  Unsurprisingly, the inability to tell the regiments apart was a problem in the Seven Years War.  Subsequently, uniforms were introduced to make it possible to distinguish the regiments again.  This example is the oldest complete uniform in Sweden.

Uniform Model 1756, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. In this year, the government had the bright idea of having all infantry, no matter what regiment, wear similar uniforms.  Unsurprisingly, the inability to tell the regiments apart was a problem in the Seven Years War.  Subsequently, uniforms were introduced to make it possible to distinguish the regiments again.  This example is the oldest complete uniform in Sweden.

Uniform Model 1779, for privates of the Södermanland Regiment, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Uniform Model 1779, for privates of the Södermanland Regiment, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Getting ready to take a shot, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Getting ready to take a shot, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

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I think I may be dead.  Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Jacket M/1802 for Privates of the Halsinge Regiment.

Jacket M/1802 for Privates of the Halsinge Regiment.

Jacket Model 1807 for Non-Commissioned officers at the Jönköping Regiment, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  This was worn by Master Sergeant Carl Fredrik Lindeberg during the battle of Savar, August 19th 1809, when he was wounded in the arm.

Jacket Model 1807 for Non-Commissioned officers at the Jönköping Regiment, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  This was worn by Master Sergeant Carl Fredrik Lindeberg during the battle of Savar, August 19th 1809, when he was wounded in the arm.

Detail of the fabric of the Jacket Model 1807 for Non-Commissioned officers at the Jönköping Regiment, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Detail of the fabric of the Jacket Model 1807 for Non-Commissioned officers at the Jönköping Regiment, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Demonstrating the availability of medical help in the 19th century, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Demonstrating the availability of medical help in the 19th century, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

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Schabraque for Officers, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. The schabraque – or saddle blanket – for the Hussar officers often imitated leopard fur.  This one is made of rya – a Scandinavian type of knotted pile carpet.

Uniform M/1823 for Privates of the Lifeguard Regiment's Dragoon Corps. After the Napoleonic wars, uniforms became more extravagant and more impractical. The coat wasn't very warm, and the helmet with its horsehair crest was heavy and cumbersome.

Uniform M/1823 for Privates of the Lifeguard Regiment’s Dragoon Corps. After the Napoleonic wars, uniforms became more extravagant and more impractical. The coat wasn’t very warm, and the helmet with its horsehair crest was heavy and cumbersome.

Detail of the front of the Uniform M/1823 for Privates of the Lifeguard Regiment's Dragoon Corps, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Detail of the front of the Uniform M/1823 for Privates of the Lifeguard Regiment’s Dragoon Corps, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

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The back of the Uniform Model 1765 for enlisted men of the Södermanland Regiment, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.

Uniform Model 1765 for enlisted men of the Södermanland Regiment, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. Even though the cutlass was officially designated a sidearm in 1748, it took time and money to equip all regiments. This regiment still used a 1685 sword during Gustav III's Russian War in 1788-1790.

Uniform Model 1765 for enlisted men of the Södermanland Regiment, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. Even though the cutlass was officially designated a sidearm in 1748, it took time and money to equip all regiments. This regiment still used a 1685 sword during Gustav III’s Russian War in 1788-1790.

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Detail of the front of the Uniform Model 1765 for enlisted men of the Södermanland Regiment, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.

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Uniform Model 1743 for Horsemen of the Cavalry Corps of the Nobility, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

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Buff Coat Model 1795 for soldiers of the Cuirassier Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

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Treed Saddle, early 18th century, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Applique Canopy, 17th century, Ottoman Empire, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. The tent belonged to the Ottoman army when it laid siege to Vienna in 1683. The camp was seized and among the loot were five large tents. The bounty was displayed in Dresden then divided amongst the victors. This tent was claimed by the Elector of Saxony, John George III. When the Swedish army later vanquished the Polish-Saxonian troops in the battle of Klissow in 1702, the tent changed hands.  It was used by the Swedish royals for various festivities and military drills until 1898, when King Oscar II donated it to the Army Museum.

Applique Canopy, 17th century, Ottoman Empire, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. The tent belonged to the Ottoman army when it laid siege to Vienna in 1683. The camp was seized and among the loot were five large tents. The bounty was displayed in Dresden then divided amongst the victors. This tent was claimed by the Elector of Saxony, John George III. When the Swedish army later vanquished the Polish-Saxonian troops in the battle of Klissow in 1702, the tent changed hands.  It was used by the Swedish royals for various festivities and military drills until 1898, when King Oscar II donated it to the Army Museum.

Detail of the tulip motif on the Applique Canopy, 17th century, Ottoman Empire, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Detail of the tulip motif on the Applique Canopy, 17th century, Ottoman Empire, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Detail of the flowers in a vase motif from the Applique Canopy, 17th century, Ottoman Empire, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Detail of the flowers in a vase motif from the Applique Canopy, 17th century, Ottoman Empire, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Applique Canopy, 17th century, Ottoman Empire, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Applique Canopy, 17th century, Ottoman Empire, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Image of what the Applique Canopy would have looked like as a tent, 17th century, Ottoman Empire, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Image of what the Applique Canopy would have looked like as a tent, 17th century, Ottoman Empire, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Detail of another type of flowers in a vase from the Applique Canopy, 17th century, Ottoman Empire, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Detail of another type of flowers in a vase from the Applique Canopy, 17th century, Ottoman Empire, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Field Kitchen, 1917, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It was horse drawn.  The wood-fired stove has room for two large and two smaller pots.  Compartments held, among other things, pre-cut meat, eating utensils, a meat grinder, frying plates and insulated crates.

Field Kitchen, 1917, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It was horse drawn.  The wood-fired stove has room for two large and two smaller pots.  Compartments held, among other things, pre-cut meat, eating utensils, a meat grinder, frying plates and insulated crates.

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Knapsack 1905, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It holds mess tins, a coat, a tent canopy and part of a tent pole. A group of soldiers could assemble a larger tent from the various tent parts.

Raoul Wallenberg and Second World War

There is a very mini-exhibition about the amazing Raoul Wallenberg.  He was a diplomat who arrived in Budapest in July 1944 and helped to save between 20,000 and 30,000 Jews.  His purpose in going to Hungary was to set up a rescue programme, in response to news that Jews were being deported en masse to camps.  Wallenberg and his fellow diplomats issued passports which identified the bearers as Swedish citizens.  Although these weren’t legal, they were generally recognised by the German authorities.  He also created safe-houses by renting 32 buildings which he declared to be extraterritorial and therefore protected by diplomatic immunity.  He called these buildings suitably Swedish things like the “The Swedish Library” and “The Swedish Research Institute” – you know, the types of places that a war-torn city in middle Europe naturally needed.  But it did the job.

Some six months after he arrived, Wallenberg was arrested for espionage by the invading Russians.  Even today no one knows exactly what happened, or why he was arrested.  Some of his belongings, including his driving license and passport, were returned to his family in 1989, but no closure was offered by explaining what happened to him.  If even the Soviets were ashamed of what they did, it must have been horrific.

How to communicate secret messages via a mac, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

How to communicate secret messages via a mac, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

As a ‘neutral’ nation, Sweden helped both the German and Allied forces during the Second World War, and some of the issues faced by the country are shown in an interesting gallery.  Sweden was subject to rationing and supplies were badly affected by blockades in the North Sea.

German uniform, 1936, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It was donated by the German state to the Army Museum on August 2, 1940.

German uniform, 1936, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It was donated by the German state to the Army Museum on August 2, 1940.

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Wallet with Ration Cards, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  It was custom-made so each item had its own slot, which made it easier to keep track of the coupons.

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Surrogate Coffee, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. As an imported commodity, coffee was scarce during WWII, and one of the first items to be rationed.  People became creative and made coffee from other things, like grains, peas, beets, potatoes, chestnuts, chicory, and acorns. Coffee remained rationed till 1951.

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Field Library, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. During the state of alert, books were collected and sent to various units.  Some twenty study circles were formed at several military camps in the north of Sweden during the war, where soldiers could dedicate themselves to in-depth studies in Russian, English and Finnish among other things. Other pastimes were offered as well, such as field cinema and performances by entertainers.

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Uniform for Colonel of the General Staff, Japan, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. It was worn by Major General Makoto Onodera, officer of the Japanese General Staff. He served as a military attache in Stockholm in 1940-45. Onodera’s task was to gather information about the development of the war in Europe and about the plans of the warring factions. The sword was donated to the Army Museum at the end of the war, when Onodera chose to do this over surrendering it to the American Embassy.

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Sword and obis, Japan, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.  The sword was donated to the Army Museum at the end of the war, when Major General Makoto Onodera chose to do this over surrendering it to the American Embassy. The Obi Sash belonged to Yuriko Onodera, who took part in her husband’s intelligence activities – including deciphering of all telegrams. She hid the code books in the obi.

The Power and the Story Exhibition

There was an interesting small exhibition which explored the way museums tell their stories and examined the nature of history.  It raised many points about how a collection is formed and I unusually took pictures of a number of information boards because I liked the phrasing of various problems that arise when trying to preserve and decipher history – for example, which objects deserve to be preserved or put on display?  How does a museum choose to accept or reject an offered donation?  This thoughtful exhibition is also a reminder that everyone, however well-meaning, has an agenda when reporting ‘the facts’.

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Exhibition on the nature of museums and history, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

The most significant display was of a housing container.  In 2010, the curators of the Army Museum went to Kosovo in order to document everyday life in Camp Victoria, which was where most of the Swedish contingent of the International Force lived.  They wanted to collect the complete living quarters of a Swedish soldier, and Per-Ivar Norell duly donated his belongings, along with the container he’d been living in.

A few months later, Norell’s stuff arrived at the museum.  Only it wasn’t in his container.  Therefore it was no longer the ‘entire living quarters’ and it never became a museum object.  In fact, once the exhibition was over, they might have got rid of it.

Housing Container from Kosovo, 1990, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Housing Container from Kosovo, 1990, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Housing Container from Kosovo, 1990, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Housing Container from Kosovo, 1990, Swedish Army Museum, Stockholm, Sweden

Is that right?  Does it matter that the container belonged to someone else, if it is basically the same as the original?  If all the items belonged to one man, is that not enough continuity?  The container becomes a ‘set’ for the belongings.  Or not.  I wonder what they did with it.

So In Summary

Yes, this museum looks at the world of the Swedish army, but it is also a social history museum, because wars don’t occur out of a social context.  War played a part in everyday life for Swedes for many centuries and the horrors and suffering involved are acknowledged and tastefully explored.  It is a beautifully curated and thoughtfully assembled collection with a good balance of evocative (sometimes downright freaky) wax mannequins, and interesting artefacts.  And it makes eerie visiting when you’re alone there on a dark winter’s night…

General Information

Basic visiting information is available in English on the museum’s website: www.armemuseum.se

Entry is free and there is a cute gift shop.

There is a trail that children can do around the museum.

How To Get There

As with most places in Stockholm, it is easily reached via public transport.  For details in English, check out the extremely handy Stockholm transport website: www.sl.se

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