Amalienborg Palace: Attics Full of Love

From the Danish Royal Family’s Lofts and Cellars Exhibition, at Amalienborg Palace, Copenhagen, Denmark

One of the reasons why I wanted to write this post, even though it refers to a trip I made a long time ago, is because I wanted to share the temporary exhibition that was on at Amalienborg during my visit in December 2016.

Basically, the Queen and the royal family’s curator chose objects from the royal storerooms.  About 2000 items showed the variety of objects that the royals hoarded and inherited.  The result was that you really did feel like you were snooping around their house, and it added to the experience of seeing the intimate-feeling studies in the main body of the Amalienborg Palace.

It’s also nice to see that even royal families find it hard to throw stuff out.

Vases in crates, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Eastern vases in crates, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Lamps and vases, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Little Danish figurines, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Little Danish figurines, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Cabinets packed with porcelain, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Cabinets packed with porcelain, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Mechanical figure, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Royal storage boxes, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Royal storage boxes, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Silver ribbon dispenser, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Book with images of relatives, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Book with images of relatives, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Costumes from Greenland and Mexico, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

"Princess Margaret's [of Sweden] first little shoes" from 1882, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

“Princess Margaret’s [of Sweden] first little shoes” from 1882, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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So many dresses in Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Matching outfits for Crown Prince Frederik and Prince Joachim, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Queen Margrethe’s hats, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Queen Margrethe’s hat looking at Queen Margrethe’s hat, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Fancy dress outfits, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Furniture and paintings, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Furniture and paintings, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Racks of paintings, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Busts and statues, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Poor boy with a bowl, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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What are you looking at?  Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Undoing the bubble-wrap on grand paintings, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Furniture from Russia, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Toy cars and bikes, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Fun pattern from a screen, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Fun pattern from a screen, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Crown Prince Frederik and Prince Joachim’s childhood go-karts with crown number plates, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Portraits and knick-knacks, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Collected stones, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Family snapshots, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Queen Alexandrine’s monkey cage, for her monkey, called Monkey, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark.  Monkey apparently hissed at people with dentures.  I really hope that is a true story.

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Ships and masks, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Queen Margrethe’s book with her doodles, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Awesome toys, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Toys and a snapshot, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Is it still tourist tat if it belongs to royals?  Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Paintings and photographs, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, Denmark.  I wonder if they deliberately made it look like the inside cover of the Tintin books?

So In Summary

We were sort of hurrying through the museum as it was near closing time and we’d spent much longer there than we’d intended.  There was a book on the exhibition, which I wish I’d got, because I really wish I could have a better idea of the stories behind the objects that were chosen to be on show: some weird, some wonderful, and some simply touching mementos of family life.  The fact that the Queen was involved in the exhibition made it all the more special and shows her connection to, and understanding of, history.  And it was jolly nice of her to want to share with us.

 

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