Magnificent Art in Lisbon – Part Two: the Portuguese Paintings

…continued from Part One…

The second part of this series on the Museum of Ancient Art is going to be on the Portuguese artists.  If, like me, you know nothing about Portuguese art, the galleries dedicated to these painters will be illuminating.  For me, one of the most interesting things was just how cute and full of homely detail they were.

Ecce Homo, c1570, unknown artist, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  The convents of the reformed Clarisses, founded in the 15th/16th centuries, were initiated by nuns who had come to Portugal from Gandia (Spain), where there was an immense devotion to the 'Ecco Homo'.   Paintings similar to this one are found in other convents in Portugal.  This version is thought to be a copy of a 15th century model.

Ecce Homo, c1570, unknown artist, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  The convents of the reformed Clarisses, founded in the 15th/16th centuries, were initiated by nuns who had come to Portugal from Gandia (Spain), where there was an immense devotion to the ‘Ecco Homo’.   Paintings similar to this one are found in other convents in Portugal.  This version is thought to be a copy of a 15th century model.

St Matthew and St John the Evangelist, Garcia Fernandes, 1530-40, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

St Matthew and St John the Evangelist, Garcia Fernandes, 1530-40, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the discarded quills and knife by a pot, St Matthew and St John the Evangelist, Garcia Fernandes, 1530-40, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the discarded quills and knife by a pot, St Matthew and St John the Evangelist, Garcia Fernandes, 1530-40, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Scene of the Annunciation from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Scene of the Annunciation from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Scene of the Adoration of the Shepherds from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  It's interesting that a shepherd is kissing a reluctant Joseph's hand.

Scene of the Adoration of the Shepherds from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  It’s interesting that a shepherd is kissing a reluctant Joseph’s hand.

Detail of the scene of the Adoration of the Shepherds from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the scene of the Adoration of the Shepherds from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Scene of the Adoration of the Magi from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Scene of the Adoration of the Magi from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the Adoration of the Magi from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the Adoration of the Magi from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the Adoration of the Magi from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the Adoration of the Magi from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the Scene of Christ in Garden from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  Notice that St John's halo is hovering like a UFO above his head.  

Detail of the Scene of Christ in Garden from the Altarpiece of Santos-o-Novo, 1540-1540, Gregorio Lopes, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  Notice that St John’s halo is hovering like a UFO above his head.

King João III of Portugal and St John the Baptist, Workshop of Cristóvão Lopes, c1564, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  It follows the model of an original painted by Anthonis Mor during his stay in Portugal in 1552.

King João III of Portugal and St John the Baptist, Workshop of Cristóvão Lopes, c1564, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  It follows the model of an original painted by Anthonis Mor during his stay in Portugal in 1552.

Catherine of Austria and St Catherine of Alexandria, after 1564, Cristóvão Lopes workshop, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Catherine of Austria and St Catherine of Alexandria, after 1564, Cristóvão Lopes workshop, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

King Sebastian I of Portugal, c1570-1575, Cristóvão de Morais, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

King Sebastian I of Portugal, c1570-1575, Cristóvão de Morais, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Lady with a Rosary, 1550-1575, unknown painter, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Lady with a Rosary, 1550-1575, unknown painter, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

The Way to Calvary, Antonio Campelo, c1560-1570, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  Campelo was the most celebrated Portuguese painter of his time, but few of his paintings survive and those that have are badly damaged. This painting was for the grand staircase of the Monastery of Jeronimos.

The Way to Calvary, Antonio Campelo, c1560-1570, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  Campelo was the most celebrated Portuguese painter of his time, but few of his paintings survive and those that have are badly damaged. This painting was for the grand staircase of the Monastery of Jeronimos.

Detail of The Way to Calvary, Antonio Campelo, c1560-1570, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of The Way to Calvary, Antonio Campelo, c1560-1570, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

The Birth of St John the Baptist, late 16th/early 17th century, Simão Rodrigues, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

The Birth of St John the Baptist, late 16th/early 17th century, Simão Rodrigues, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail showing angels sprinkling petals over St John, from The Birth of St John the Baptist,late 16th/early 17th century, Simão Rodrigues, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail showing angels sprinkling petals over St John, from The Birth of St John the Baptist, 1600-1525, Simão Rodrigues, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of Elizabeth refusing some soup, from The Birth of St John the Baptist, late 16th/early 17th century, Simão Rodrigues, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of Elizabeth refusing some soup, from The Birth of St John the Baptist, 1600-1525, Simão Rodrigues, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

View of the Monastery and Square of Belém, 1657, Filipe Lobo, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. Urban views were fairly uncommon in Portuguese painting, and even rarer if not linked to a religious vow or festivity.  Lobo learned from Dirk Stoop, who was in Portugal in the 1650s.  Stoop is known to have painted a similar but larger work, now in the Mauritshuis, which was a prototype of this painting.

View of the Monastery and Square of Belém, 1657, Filipe Lobo, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. Urban views were fairly uncommon in Portuguese painting, and even rarer if not linked to a religious vow or festivity.  Lobo learned from Dirk Stoop, who was in Portugal in the 1650s.  Stoop is known to have painted a similar but larger work, now in the Mauritshuis, which was a prototype of this painting.

Detail of figures with flowers, from View of the Monastery and Square of Belém, 1657, Filipe Lobo, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of figures with flowers, from View of the Monastery and Square of Belém, 1657, Filipe Lobo, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of a woman carrying a basket, from View of the Monastery and Square of Belém, 1657, Filipe Lobo, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of a woman carrying a basket, from View of the Monastery and Square of Belém, 1657, Filipe Lobo, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the front entrance of St Jerónimos from View of the Monastery and Square of Belém, 1657, Filipe Lobo, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the front entrance of St Jerónimos from View of the Monastery and Square of Belém, 1657, Filipe Lobo, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of two men on horses from a View of the Monastery and Square of Belém, 1657, Filipe Lobo, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of two men on horses from a View of the Monastery and Square of Belém, 1657, Filipe Lobo, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Portrait of João V and the Battle of Cape Matapan, 1719, Domenico Duprà, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. Dupra was the King's favourite portrait painter. Born in Turin, he ended up by living in the Royal Palace.

Portrait of João V and the Battle of Cape Matapan, 1719, Domenico Duprà, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. Dupra was the King’s favourite portrait painter. Born in Turin, he ended up by living in the Royal Palace.

Portrait of the Family of the 1st Viscount of Santarem, c1813, Domingos António de Sequeira, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  The Viscount is at the table. On the left his second wife and their 5 children. The painting above shows his first born son and his uncles, the Viscounts of Vila Nova da Rainha, who were with the absent court in Brazil. 

Portrait of the Family of the 1st Viscount of Santarem, c1813, Domingos António de Sequeira, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  The Viscount is at the table. On the left his second wife and their 5 children. The painting above shows his first born son and his uncles, the Viscounts of Vila Nova da Rainha, who were with the absent court in Brazil.

João Baptista Verde and Mariana Benedita Vitória Verde, 1809, Domingos António de Sequeira, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. Sequeira married Mariana in 1809.  There's some writing on the wall saying it's a gift to 'my greenish friend' - a pun, since verde means green.  The artist was grateful to Verde for supporting him when he was arrested and accused of collaborationism during the French occupation.  I find it really interesting that Mariana looks profoundly depressed.

João Baptista Verde and Mariana Benedita Vitória Verde, 1809, Domingos António de Sequeira, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. Sequeira married Mariana in 1809.  There’s some writing on the wall saying it’s a gift to ‘my greenish friend’ – a pun, since verde means green.  The artist was grateful to Verde for supporting him when he was arrested and accused of collaborationism during the French occupation.  I find it really interesting that Mariana looks profoundly depressed.

The artist's daughter Mariana Benedita Vitória de Sequeira playing the spinet, 1822/3, Domingos António de Sequeira, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.

The artist’s daughter Mariana Benedita Vitória de Sequeira playing the spinet, 1822/3, Domingos António de Sequeira, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.

St Vincent Panels, 1450s, Nuno Gonçalves, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

St Vincent Panels, 1450s, Nuno Gonçalves, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the St Vincent Panels, 1450s, Nuno Gonçalves, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the St Vincent Panels, 1450s, Nuno Gonçalves, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Portrait of  João I of Portugal, 1450-1500, unknown master, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. The inscription that runs under the frame states that this was painted shortly after his death.  It's the oldest known portrait of a Portuguese monarch.

Portrait of  João I of Portugal, 1450-1500, unknown master, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. The inscription that runs under the frame states that this was painted shortly after his death.  It’s the oldest known portrait of a Portuguese monarch.

Altarpiece of São Francisco de Évora, 1508-1511, Francisco Henriques, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Altarpiece of São Francisco de Évora, 1508-1511, Francisco Henriques, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

The Last Supper from the Altarpiece of São Francisco de Évora, 1508-1511, Francisco Henriques, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

The Last Supper from the Altarpiece of São Francisco de Évora, 1508-1511, Francisco Henriques, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the soft looking bread and the sleeping John the Evangelist from The Last Supper from the Altarpiece of São Francisco de Évora, 1508-1511, Francisco Henriques, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the soft looking bread and the sleeping John the Evangelist from The Last Supper from the Altarpiece of São Francisco de Évora, 1508-1511, Francisco Henriques, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the interesting floor tiles from the The Last Supper from the Altarpiece of São Francisco de Évora, 1508-1511, Francisco Henriques, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the interesting floor tiles from the The Last Supper from the Altarpiece of São Francisco de Évora, 1508-1511, Francisco Henriques, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the altar in The Mass of St Gregory from the Altarpiece of São Francisco de Évora, 1508-1511, Francisco Henriques, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the altar in The Mass of St Gregory from the Altarpiece of São Francisco de Évora, 1508-1511, Francisco Henriques, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

St Clare of Assisi and St Colette, c1520, Master of Lourinha, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

St Clare of Assisi and St Colette, c1520, Master of Lourinha, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Adoration of the Magi, 1520-25, Gregorio Lopes & Jorge Leal, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Adoration of the Magi, 1520-25, Gregorio Lopes & Jorge Leal, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the Magi from the Adoration of the Magi, 1520-25, Gregorio Lopes & Jorge Leal, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the Magi from the Adoration of the Magi, 1520-25, Gregorio Lopes & Jorge Leal, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Frei Carlos

One of the most interesting finds was the work of Frei Carlos.  He was a Flemish painter, who took his vows in 1517 at the Convent of Espinheiro in Évora, with the Order of the Hieronymite monks.  He worked in Évora, but also for other monasteries of his order.  Not a lot is known about him, but he seemed to have been inspired by the slightly old-fashioned Flemish style used by Hans Memling and Gerard David.  As a fan of Flemish art, I found Frei Carlos’ painting really charming – he goes for that contained-world type of thing you get with Memling and David, but the scale is usually larger with Carlos.

DSC_8698

St Vincent, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of St Vincent and his lovely boat from St Vincent, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of St Vincent and his lovely boat from St Vincent, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of a snail from St Vincent, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of a snail from St Vincent, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

The Assumption, 1520/1530, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. The painting is from the Monastery of Espinheiro, Évora.

The Assumption, 1520/1530, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. The painting is from the Monastery of Espinheiro, Évora.

Detail of the musical angels, from The Assumption, 1520/1530, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of the musical angels, from The Assumption, 1520/1530, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

The Ascension, 1520/1530, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. The painting originates from the Monastery of Espinheiro, Évora.

The Ascension, 1520/1530, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. The painting originates from the Monastery of Espinheiro, Évora.

Detail of Jesus' feet of The Ascension, 1520/1530, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of Jesus’ feet of The Ascension, 1520/1530, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

The Calvary Triptych (The Profession of St Paula; The Calvary; The Baptism of Jesus), 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. 

The Calvary Triptych (The Profession of St Paula; The Calvary; The Baptism of Jesus), 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.

The profession of St Paula, from The Calvary Triptych, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  St Paula became a disciple of Jerome and was the patron of the female branch of the Order of St Jerome. She often appears with her daughter, St Eustochium.

The profession of St Paula, from The Calvary Triptych, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  St Paula became a disciple of Jerome and was the patron of the female branch of the Order of St Jerome. She often appears with her daughter, St Eustochium.

St Francis Receiving the Stigmata, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. It was a side panel of a triptych along with St Anthony.

St Francis Receiving the Stigmata, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal. It was a side panel of a triptych along with St Anthony.

Detail of St Francis Receiving the Stigmata, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of St Francis Receiving the Stigmata, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

St Anthony and the Child Jesus, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  This partners the stigmata of St Francis, shown above. This scene shows a legend that Jesus appeared to St Anthony in his bedchamber.  Jesus plays with the books, showing that St Anthony doesn't need any teaching beyond his.

St Anthony and the Child Jesus, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal.  This partners the stigmata of St Francis, shown above. This scene shows a legend that Jesus appeared to St Anthony in his bedchamber.  Jesus plays with the books, showing that St Anthony doesn’t need any teaching beyond his.

Detail of St Anthony and the Child Jesus, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of St Anthony and the Child Jesus, 1520/30, Frei Carlos, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Lisbon Earthquake of 1755

In a room all to itself, there are some paintings which relate to the traumatic earthquake that hit Lisbon in 1755.  Most are by João Glama Ströberle, who was in the city at the time and spent decades completing his magnum opus – a painting depicting the disaster.

DSC_9371.jpeg

Ex-voto to the Virgin of Estrela, c1756, unknown painter, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

The Earthquake of 1755, c1756-1792, João Glama Strobërle, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

The Earthquake of 1755, c1756-1792, João Glama Ströberle, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of The Earthquake of 1755, c1756-1792, João Glama Strobërle, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Detail of The Earthquake of 1755, c1756-1792, João Glama Ströberle, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Study of a woman assisting a victim, c1756, João Glama Strobërle, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Study of a woman assisting a victim, c1756, João Glama Ströberle, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Study for a woman from the back, c1756, João Glama Ströberle, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Study for a woman from the back, c1756, João Glama Ströberle, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Self-portrait, c1730, João Glama Ströberle, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

Self-portrait, c1730, João Glama Ströberle, National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal

…please click here for part three…

No Comments

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: